Quick Answer: How Do The British Say Butter?

How is Porsche pronounced?

In the proper pronunciation, “Porsche” is actually a two-syllable word.

So it is really pronounced like “Por-shuh.” The team at Hendrick Porsche is happy to help you with all of your Porsche questions, including how to say it!.

How do you pronounce Nike?

Similarly sporting brand Nike has caused much debate about the pronunciation of its name, taken from the Greek goddess of victory. The name is pronounced ‘ni-key’ not ‘nyke’ as it is commonly known.

How do you say ate in British English?

Young people in Britain are increasingly likely to call the eighth letter of the alphabet “haitch,” rather than “aitch,” and pronounce the past tense of “to eat” as “ate” instead of the old-fashioned “et.” “There is no right or wrong,” Walshe said.

How do you say CONtroversy UK?

Three quarters of Britons taking part say “conTROversy”, with the emphasis on the middle syllable, rather than the previously conventional “CONtroversy”. Jonnie Robinson, curator of sociolinguistics and education at the British Library, said the word had undergone a “stress shift”.

Is flour and flower pronounced the same?

The first one is “flower | flour”. Both are pronounced exactly the same.

Does bloody mean the F word?

Originally Answered: Does ‘bloody’ mean the ‘F word’? No. The word bloody is a minor word, whereas the F word is expressing extreme total displeasure at the person or subject, in near enough the strongest rudest way they can think of. Bloody: used to emphasise what you are saying in a slightly rude way.

How do you say say in British?

Wells gives the result of a poll they conducted in 1998 among British English speakers concerning various words, with the result that “says” is pronounced /sɛz/ by 84% of respondents and /seɪz/ by 16% [the dictionary uses the transcription /e/ for the DRESS vowel, so they write “sez”, but I’m normalizing for …

What is a nap called in England?

A British people use kip to mean either a nap or a longer sleep; it can also mean the idea or act of sleeping, as in “Will you be quiet? I’m trying to get some kip in here!” It can also be a verb: “They kipped down for the night”.

Why do British say ET ate?

Young people in Britain are increasingly likely to call the eighth letter of the alphabet “haitch,” rather than “aitch,” and pronounce the past tense of “to eat” as “ate” instead of the old-fashioned “et.” … Britons increasingly pronounce “schedule” in the American way – “schedule” rather than “shedule.”

How do Brits say good morning?

Useful phrases in British EnglishPhraseBritish EnglishPleased to meet youPleased to meet you Nice to meet you A pleasure to meet youGood morning (Morning greeting)Good morning MorningGood afternoon (Afternoon greeting)Good afternoon AfternoonGood evening (Evening greeting)Good evening Evening56 more rows

What is UK English called?

British English is the standard dialect of the English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom. Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom.

How do you say yes in a cute way?

Creative Ways to Say “Yes”Okey-dokey!I’m at your behest.Aye aye, captain!I was born for this!That would be a Y-E-S!You just stole the words out of my mouth.Right on, brother/sister.Definitely not NO.More items…•

What is a fancy word for yes?

SYNONYMS. all right, alright, very well, of course, by all means, sure, certainly, absolutely, indeed, affirmative, in the affirmative, agreed, roger. Scottish, Northern English archaic aye. aye aye. informal yeah, yah, yep, yup, uh-huh, okay, OK, okey-dokey, okey-doke.

What do you say in a British accent?

11 Bloody Brilliant British English Phrases“Fancy a cuppa?” meaning: “Would you like a cup of tea?” … “Alright?” meaning: “Hey, how are you?” … “I’m knackered!” meaning: “I’m tired.” … Cheeky. meaning: playful; mischievous. … “I’m chuffed to bits!” meaning “I’m very pleased.” … Bloody. meaning: very. … To bodge something. … “I’m pissed.”More items…

How do you say ate in English?

The traditional RP pronunciation of ate is /ɛt/. The second edition of the Oxford English Dictionary agrees: /ɛt/, occasionally /eɪt/.